Alerts
BIG CHANGES AT DHS
06.17.19
Big news today out of the Department of Human Services - Director Jerry Foxhoven resigned effective immediately.  Department of Public Health Director... Read More...
LEGISLATOR RESIGNING, SENATE COMMITTEE CHANGES
06.14.19
Rep. Lisa Heddens (D-Ames) announces she will resign from the Iowa Legislature, prompting a special election for this Ames sweat.  Rep. Heddens is a... Read More...
Governor Finishes Actions on Bills
05.24.19
With just minutes to spare before the three-day Memorial Day weekend, Governor Kim Reynolds took final action on the remaining bills sent to her this... Read More...
Session Ends!
04.27.19
After late nights and long debates, controversy and agreement, the 2019 Iowa Legislature has adjourned for the year.  They will not come back together... Read More...
State Representative Changes Parties; Now a Democrat
04.23.19
As. hard as we try, we just cannot keep our Guide to the Iowa Legislature updated!!!  First, Sen. Danielson resigned early in session.  Now, Rep. Andy... Read More...


Our Network

Be An Informed Voter

More articles »

The winners of this year’s election will be making decisions that directly impact your daily life. Understanding each candidate’s position on the issues you care about is the key to making informed voting decisions on Election Day. 

There are many ways you can become an informed voter – from reading the newspaper and watching/listening to radio and TV programs to attending candidate events and listening to debates.  There are also many resources to help you research the candidates and their positions:

Information about all Democratic candidates for Governor, Congressional, and statewide offices: http://www.iowademocrats.org/. Click on the “Candidates” tab at the top of the website.

Information about all Republican candidates for Governor and Congressional offices: http://www.iowagop.org/. Choose “Candidates” under the “About” tab at the top of the website.

Information on state legislative candidates can be found at: http://www.infonetiowa.org/news/alerts/235-informed-voting-resources/.

A complete candidate list (along with contact information) is located on the Iowa Secretary of State’s website at http://sos.iowa.gov/elections/pdf/2014/general/candlist.pdf

Legislative and Congressional district maps are located on the Iowa Secretary’s of State’s website at http://sos.iowa.gov/elections/maps/.


The best way to find out how a candidate stands on issues is to ask.

ID Action has asked the candidates for US Senate, US Congress, Secretary of State, and Governor a few questions about their stands on issues of concern to voters with disabilities.  We will post each candidate's response to these questions at www.infonetiowa.org and www.idaction.org.


QUESTIONS FOR CANDIDATES FOR IOWA GOVERNOR:

  1. One in five Iowans are affected by disabilities. They want choices about where they live and work but those choices are too often limited by the inadequacy of state and federal policies and funding and the availability of community-based options. What specific measures are you willing to take to make sure that Iowans with disabilities have options to live, learn, work, and recreate in the communities and settings of their choice?
     
  2. Significant work has gone into the ongoing regionalization and redesign of the state's disability services system, yet funding continues to be unpredictable, creating uncertainties for the people receiving these services.  What would you do as Governor to ensure that services are available and funded, and what additional challenges do you see ahead?
     
  3. Iowans with brain injuries and developmental disabilities other than an intellectual disability have very few options for accessing services.  They are not considered "mandated populations" for regional services, private health insurance plans do not cover the types of services needed to maintain independence, and the existing "brain injury waiver" has a growing waiting list.  Iowa currently has no "developmental disabilities" waiver to extend Medicaid services to this population.  What would you do as Governor to make sure that Iowans with brain injuries and developmental disabilities have access to needed supports and services?

QUESTIONS FOR CANDIDATES FOR IOWA SECRETARY OF STATE: 

  1. Ensuring that citizens can vote with little or no difficulty is fundamental to a democracy yet many people with disabilities continue to report difficulties in exercising their right to vote. Despite improvements in recent years, voter turnout among 300,000+ voting age Iowans with disabilities in 2012 was 6.3% lower than turnout among voters without disabilities. If elected Secretary of State, what would you do to improve voter turnout among Iowans with disabilities and ensure that Iowa's electoral process and polling places are accessible to Iowans of all abilities?

QUESTIONS FOR CANDIDATES FOR US SENATE:

  1. The United State Senate has not yet voted to ratify the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; an international disability treaty supported by a broad coalition of more than 800 disability, civil rights, faith, business, and veterans’ organizations.  The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities provides a vital framework for creating legislation and policies around the world that embrace the rights and dignity of all persons with disabilities.  The US signed the treaty in 2009, but the Senate fell five votes short of the super majority vote required.  If elected, would you vote to ratify this treaty?
  2.  One in five Iowans are affected by disabilities. They want choices about where they live and work but those choices are too often limited by the inadequacy of state and federal policies and funding and the availability of community-based options. What specific measures are you willing to take to make sure that Iowans with disabilities have options to live, learn, work, and recreate in the communities and settings of their choice?

 

 Take Action Now - and help shape the elections this year!  

You may have other questions for people running for office in your area.  You might ask about funding for home and community based services (HCBS) waivers, or a gas tax to fund road repairs, or funding for your local library. Whatever your issue, ask the candidates about their plans to address your issues and concerns.  Call or email, call into radio shows, ask questions at forums or debates, or contact the campaign office.  You could ask the questions listed above, some of the sample ones listed below, or your own.  Just take some time now to jot down a few questions, so you have them ready when a candidate makes the rounds in your community, doorknocks your house, or calls to ask for your vote.

        • What would you do to make voting more accessible?
        • What will you do to make public transportation more accessible in our community?
        • What will your prioritie be if you are elected to office?
        • What is the first thing you would like to work on if elected?
        • Will you support ending waiver waiting lists so people can access the services they need?
        • What things can you do to help build a more inclusive community?
        • What will you do to help people with disabilities who want to work find training and jobs?

Finally, it takes a lot of people to run a campaign for public office, so if you find someone you like (and you like the answers they gave you), offer to volunteer for them.  Make calls, knock on doors, write postcards, put up yardsigns, march in parades, help with events, or stuff envelopes.  Candidates never say no to help - and they always remember the people who helped them get elected!